There's a reason why we call her Queen Bey. Sunday night's Grammy Awards was the talk of the music world, but above all, the most memorable moment of the evening is all thanks to the Queen herself, Beyoncé. The legendary performer was previously tied with Quincy Jones for the second-most Grammy wins. Last night, she broke that record, making her the Recording Academy's most-decorated female artist in Grammy's history.

Beyoncé surpassed bluegrass-country singer Alison Krauss who previously held the record with 27 wins overall. The Houston native's 28th win came as a result of her single "Black Parade," which earned her the award for the Best R&B Performance.

In her speech, she shouted out her 9-year-old daughter Blue Ivy – who also took home her first-ever Grammy for "Brown Skin Girl." She also shouted out her mom and 3-year-old twins Rumi and Sir. The mom of three shared her gratitude for the record's recognition and how important it was to release it at the time that she did.

"Thank you, guys. As an artist, I believe it's my job and all of our jobs to reflect the times," she said. "I wanted to uplift and encourage and celebrate all of the Black kings and queens who inspire me and inspire the whole world. I've been working my whole life, since nine years old, and I can't believe this happened. I can't believe this happened. It's such a magical night."

Her reaction to breaking her own record was another standout moment from the night that made her a noteworthy meme on social media.

The Recording Academy honored "Black Parade" with a brief tribute at the conclusion of the awards, which in turn served as a nod to her visual album, "Black is King." Beyoncé's winning streak also welcomed an award from her collaboration, "Savage Remix," with fellow Houston artist Megan Thee Stallion, making them the first pair of women in Grammys history to win Best Rap Performance. Not to mention, they also secured a win for the same song as Best Rap Song of the year. It's safe to say, Houston, stand up!

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